GREAT DIRECTOR, FANTASTIC MOVIES..Don Siegel’s Westerns

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1. The Duel at Silver Creek (1952)

Approved | 77 min | Western

Marshal Tyrone and the Silver Kid form an uneasy alliance against a gang of claim jumpers.

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: Audie Murphy, Faith Domergue, Stephen McNally, Susan Cabot

 

2. Frontier (1955–1956)
Episode: Paper Gunman (1955)

Western

A newspaper reporter determined to write articles about famous gunslingers finds that real gunmen are in short supply, so he decides to invent one. He buys a young man who hero-worships ..

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: John Smith, Carol Thurston, King Donovan

3. Flaming Star (1960)

Approved | 101 min | Action, Drama, Romance

When fighting breaks out between two cultures in West Texas, the mixed-blood Pacer tries to act as a peacemaker, but the “flaming star of death” pulls him irrevocably into the deadly violence.

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: Elvis Presley, Barbara Eden, Steve Forrest, Dolores del Rio..

4. Destry (1964)
Episode: The Solid Gold Girl (1964)

60 min | Western

While searching for the man who framed him for a crime he didn’t commit, Destry stumbles into a town where an old cell mate of his is being tried for robbery and murder. The outlaw has ..

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: John Gavin, Tammy Grimes, Claude Akins, Broderick Crawford

 

5. The Legend of Jesse James (1965–1966)
Episode: Manhunt (1965)

30 min | Western

 Director: Don Siegel | Stars: Christopher Jones, Allen Case, John Marley

6. Stranger on the Run (1967 TV Movie)

97 min | Drama, Thriller, Western

Former inmate and drunkard Ben Chamberlain arrives in a railroad town looking for a woman, causing the railroad police deputies to manhunt for Ben.

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: Henry Fonda, Anne Baxter, Michael Parks..

7. Coogan’s Bluff (1968)   (Crime)

R | 93 min | Action, Comedy, Crime

 Arizona Deputy Sheriff Coogan (Clint Eastwood) is sent to New York City to escort an escaped fugitive back for trial.

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: Clint Eastwood, Lee J. Cobb, Susan Clark, Tisha

8. Death of a Gunfighter (1969)

M | 94 min | Western

A Texas town’s council fires the town’s old-fashioned marshal who refuses to resign, thus leading to violence from both sides.

Directors: Don Siegel, Robert Totten | Stars: Richard Widmark, Lena Horne, Carroll O’Connor, David Opatoshu..

9. Two Mules for Sister Sara (1970)

GP | 116 min | Adventure, Romance, War

Nun Sara (Shirley MacLaine) is on the run in Mexico and is saved from cowboys by Hogan (Clint Eastwood), who is preparing for a future mission to capture a French fort. The pair become good friends, but Sara never does tell him the true reason behind her being outlawed.

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: Clint Eastwood, Shirley MacLaine..

10. The Beguiled (1971)

R | 105 min | Drama, Thriller, War

While imprisoned in a Confederate girls’ boarding school, an injured Union soldier cons his way into each of the lonely women’s hearts, causing them to turn on each other, and eventually, on him.

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth

11. The Shootist (1976)

PG | 100 min | Drama, Romance, Western

A dying gunfighter spends his last days looking for a way to die with a minimum of pain and a maximum of dignity.

Director: Don Siegel | Stars: John Wayne, Lauren Bacall, Ron Howard, James Stewart

 

Don Siegel, byname of Donald Siegel, (born October 26, 1912, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.—died April 20, 1991, Nipomo, California), American motion-picture director who specialized in action-packed films with tightly constructed narratives. He frequently worked with actor Clint Eastwood, and their collaborations include the classics Coogan’s Bluff (1968) and Dirty Harry (1971).

Siegel studied at Jesus College, Cambridge, and at London’s Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. After a brief stint as an actor, he joined Warner Brothers studios near Hollywood as an assistant film librarian. He later worked as an editor before joining the studio’s montage department, where he contributed to Now, Voyager (1942), Casablanca (1942), and Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), among other films.

Siegel’s first directorial efforts were the short films Star in the Night and Hitler Lives? (uncredited; both 1945); they both won Academy Awards and resulted in his graduating to features. His first was The Verdict (1946), a solid Scotland Yard period piece that was the eighth and last movie to feature the popular on-screen team of Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre. Night unto Night was shot in 1947 but not released until 1949. The romantic drama featured Ronald Reagan as an epileptic scientist and Viveca Lindfors as a widow haunted by her late husband; Siegel and Lindfors were married from 1949 to 1954. He next made The Big Steal (1949), a lighthearted crime yarn that reunited Robert Mitchum and Jane Greer, the stars of Jacques Tourneur’s noir classic Out of the Past (1947). Although not up to that level, The Big Steal showed Siegel’s facility with hard-boiled action, the genre in which he would eventually make his reputation.

First, however, Siegel struggled through The Duel at Silver Creek (1952), an uninspired Audie Murphy western; No Time for Flowers (1952), an unsatisfying rework of Ernst Lubitsch’s comedy classic Ninotchka (1939); and the fast-moving but far-fetched melodrama Count the Hours (1953), in which Macdonald Carey played an attorney defending a migrant worker (John Craven) who is wrongly convicted of murder. Siegel next made China Venture (1953), a middling World War II drama that pitted a U.S. Marine commando unit against Japanese soldiers.

In 1954 Siegel registered his first major critical and commercial success with Riot in Cell Block 11, a classic prison drama made for producer Walter Wanger, who had served four months in jail and been appalled by the conditions there. The film featured the fast pace and tight editing that would come to define Siegel’s productions. Almost as exciting was Private Hell 36 (1954), a noir about the problems that arise after two detectives (Steve Cochran and Howard Duff) decide to keep stolen money that they have recovered; Ida Lupino played a nightclub singer, and she cowrote the script (with Collier Young).

 

Although Siegel’s forte seemed to be in action and crime dramas, his next picture was the forgettable An Annapolis Story (1955), about brothers (John Derek and Kevin McCarthy) who both love the same woman. Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), however, was a huge leap forward. One of the best science-fiction movies of the decade, it triumphed over a low-wattage cast and a minuscule budget to become a classic of paranoia. It centres on a small town that is being quietly invaded by aliens, who take over the bodies of residents. Crime in the Streets (1956), an adaptation of a 1955 TV drama by Reginald Rose, featured original cast members John Cassavetes and future director Mark Rydell as disaffected teens, with Sal Mineo added for star power. Siegel’s next project was Baby Face Nelson (1957), a violent look at the infamous gangster (played by Mickey Rooney).

At that point it was not clear where Siegel was going with his career—many film directors had entered television without ever returning to feature work—but his next two projects answered that question with authority. The feature Madigan (1968) was arguably the best police procedural of the 1960s, with Richard Widmark providing an acclaimed performance in the title role of a detective searching for a killer; also notable was Fonda as a police commissioner and Inger Stevens as Madigan’s wife. In 1968 Siegel also helmed Coogan’s Bluff, which established Clint Eastwood with American audiences after his years of working overseas with director Sergio Leone on a series of “spaghetti westerns.” In that classic of action filmmaking, Eastwood portrayed a laconic Arizona deputy sent to New York City to extradite an escaped killer. The renegade loner with uncertain morals became a common character in Siegel’s films. For his next project, he replaced Robert Totten on Death of a Gunfighter (1969), which featured Widmark again. However, both Siegel and Totten had their names removed from the film, and it was released with the credit Allen Smithee—the standard pseudonym for work disowned by its director.

Siegel then reunited with Eastwood for a series of movies. Two Mules for Sister Sara (1970) was a rather whimsical western with Eastwood as a cowboy who rescues a prostitute pretending to be a nun (Shirley MacLaine) from three would-be rapists; it was based on a Budd Boetticher story. Next was The Beguiled (1971), an unusual psychological drama set late in the American Civil War. Eastwood played an injured Union soldier whose arrival at a girl’s boarding school in the South leads to tension and ultimately murder. The Gothic film was initially rejected by American audiences, though it proved popular in Europe. Later in 1971, however, moviegoers in the United States turned out in droves for Dirty Harry, which was probably Siegel’s best-known picture (though not necessarily his most admired). It catapulted Eastwood to superstardom as the quintessential antihero of the 1970s; he played Harry Callahan, a tough San Francisco policeman hunting a serial killer. Some critics decried the violence, but Dirty Harry led to four profitable sequels, though none was directed by Siegel.

britanica .BY MOVIES

 

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