10 the Best Ward Bond Movies

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BEST 10 WARD BOND MOVIES :

10.Hondo

John Wayne, James Arness

Released: 1953

Directed by: John Farrow, John Ford

Hondo is a 1953 Warnercolor 3D Western film starring John Wayne and directed by John Farrow. The screenplay is based on the July 5, 1952 Collier’s short story “The Gift of Cochise” by Louis L’Amour…

9.Young Mr. Lincoln

Henry Fonda, Ward Bond

Released: 1939

Directed by: John Ford

Young Mr. Lincoln is a 1939 partly fictionalized biopic about the early life of President Abraham Lincoln, directed by John Ford and starring Henry Fonda. Ford and producer Darryl F. Zanuck fought..

8. 3 Godfathers

John Wayne, Ward Bond

Released: 1948

Directed by: John Ford

3 Godfathers is a 1948 American Western film directed by John Ford and filmed primarily in Death Valley, California. The screenplay, written by Frank S. Nugent and Laurence Stallings, is based on the…

7.The Wings of Eagles

John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara

Released: 1957

Directed by: John Ford

The Wings of Eagles is a 1957 Metrocolor film starring John Wayne, based on the true story of Frank “Spig” Wead and the history of U.S. Naval aviation from its inception through World War II. The..

6.My Darling Clementine

Henry Fonda, Walter Brennan

Released: 1946

Directed by: John Ford

My Darling Clementine, a 1946 film, regarded as one of the best Western movies made by Director John Ford, stars Henry Fonda as Wyatt Earp during the period leading up to Gunfight at the OK Corral..

5.Wagon Master

James Arness, Ben Johnson

Released: 1950

Directed by: John Ford

Wagon Master is a 1950 Western film about a Mormon pioneer wagon train to the San Juan River in Utah. The film was conceived, produced, and directed by John Ford, who is often listed among the..

4.They Were Expendable

John Wayne, Donna Reed

Released: 1945

Directed by: Robert Montgomery, John Ford

They Were Expendable is a 1945 American film directed by John Ford and starring Robert Montgomery and John Wayne and featuring Donna Reed. The film is based on the book by William L. White, relating…

 

3.Rio Bravo

John Wayne, Dean Martin

Released: 1959

Directed by: Howard Hawks

Rio Bravo is a 1959 American Western film produced and directed by Howard Hawks and starring John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson, Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, and Ward Bond. Written by Jules..

2.Gone with the Wind

Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh

Released: 1939

Directed by: Sam Wood, George Cukor, Victor Fleming

Gone with the Wind is a 1939 American epic historical romance film adapted from Margaret Mitchell’s Pulitzer-winning 1936 novel. It was produced by David O. Selznick of Selznick International…

1.It’s a Wonderful Life

James Stewart, Donna Reed

Released: 1946

Directed by: Frank Capra

It’s a Wonderful Life is a 1946 American Christmas fantasy comedy-drama film produced and directed by Frank Capra, based on the short story “The Greatest Gift”, which Philip Van Doren Stern wrote in.

Briefly about the legendary actor

Gruff, burly American character actor. Born in 1903 in Benkelman, Nebraska (confirmed by Social Security records; sources stating 1905 or Denver, Colorado are in error.) Bond grew up in Denver, the son of a lumberyard worker. He attended the University of Southern California, where he got work as an extra through a football teammate who would become both his best friend and one of cinema’s biggest stars: John Wayne. Director John Ford promoted Bond from extra to supporting player in the film Salute (1929), and became another fast friend. An arrogant man of little tact, yet fun-loving in the extreme, Bond was either loved or hated by all who knew him. His face and personality fit perfectly into almost any type of film, and he appeared in hundreds of pictures in his more than 30-year career, in both bit parts and major supporting roles. In the films of Wayne and Ford, particularly, he was nearly always present. Among his most memorable roles are John L. Sullivan in Gentleman Jim (1942), Det. Tom Polhaus in The Maltese Falcon (1941) and the Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnson Clayton The Searchers (1956). An ardent but anti-intellectual patriot, he was perhaps the most vehement proponent, among the Hollywood community, of blacklisting in the witch hunts of the 1950s, and he served as a most unforgiving president of the ultra-right-wing Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals. In the mid-’50s he gained his greatest fame as the star of TV’s Wagon Train (1957). During its production, Bond traveled to Dallas, Texas, to attend a football game and died there in his hotel room of a massive heart attack.

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