LIST OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL MOVIES, MUSIC HITS..GREAT AND CONTROVERSIAL ACTOR

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List of the best Frank Sinatra movies, ranked best to worst with movie trailers when available

 

Frank Sinatra’s highest grossing movies have received a lot of accolades over the years, earning millions upon millions around the world.

TOP 15 FILMS OF FRANK SINATRA:

1.From Here to Eternity

From Here to Eternity is a 1953 drama film directed by Fred Zinnemann and based on the novel of the same name by James Jones. The picture deals with the tribulations of three soldiers, played by Burt Lancaster, Montgomery Clift, and Frank Sinatra, stationed on Hawaii in the months leading up to the attack. Deborah Kerr and Donna Reed portray the women in their lives and the supporting cast includes Ernest Borgnine, Philip Ober, Jack Warden, Mickey Shaughnessy, Claude Akins, and George

2.The Manchurian Candidate

The Manchurian Candidate is a 1962 American Cold War suspense thriller directed by John Frankenheimer that stars Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey and Janet Leigh and co-stars Angela Lansbury, Henry Silva and James Gregory. Its screenplay, by George Axelrod, is based on the 1959 novel by Richard Condon. The premise of the film is the brainwashing of the son of a prominent right-wing political family as an unwitting assailant in an international communist conspiracy.

 

 

 

3.The Man with the Golden Arm

The Man with the Golden Arm is a 1955 American drama film, based on the novel of the same name by Nelson Algren, which tells the story of a heroin addict who gets clean while in prison, but struggles to stay that way in the outside world. It stars Frank Sinatra, Eleanor Parker, Kim Novak, Arnold Stang and Darren McGavin. It was adapted for the screen by Walter Newman, Lewis Meltzer and Ben Hecht, and directed by Otto Preminger

4.Von Ryan’s Express

Von Ryan’s Express is a 1965 WWII adventure film about a group of Allied prisoners who after Italy’s armistice with the Allies in September 1943, conduct a daring mass escape by hijacking a freight train and fleeing through German-occupied Italy to Switzerland. It stars Frank Sinatra and Trevor Howard, and is based on a novel by David Westheimer, and directed by Mark Robson. The film changes several aspects of the novel, including its ending, which is considerably more upbeat in the book.

5.Pal Joey

Pal Joey is a 1957 American Technicolor musical film, loosely adapted from the musical play of the same name, and starring Rita Hayworth, Frank Sinatra, and Kim Novak. Jo Ann Greer sang for Hayworth, as she had done previously in Affair in Trinidad and Miss Sadie Thompson. Kim Novak’s singing voice was dubbed by Trudy Erwin. George Sidney directed, with the choreography managed by Hermes Pan.

6.Anchors Aweigh

Anchors Aweigh is a 1945 American Technicolor musical comedy film directed by George Sidney and starring Frank Sinatra, Kathryn Grayson, and Gene Kelly, in which two sailors go on a four-day shore leave in Hollywood, accompanied by music and song, meet an aspiring young singer and try to help her get an audition at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. In addition to a live-action Kelly dancing with Jerry Mouse the cartoon mouse, the movie also features José Iturbi, Pamela Britton, Dean Stockwell

 

 

 7.On the Town

On the Town is a 1949 musical film with music by Leonard Bernstein and Roger Edens and book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. It is an adaptation of the Broadway stage musical of the same name produced in 1944, although many changes in script and score were made from the original stage version; for instance, most of Bernstein’s music was dropped in favor of new songs by Edens, who disliked the majority of the Bernstein score, for being too complex and too operatic.

 

8.Guys and Dolls

Guys and Dolls is a 1955 musical film starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra and Vivian Blaine. The film was made by Samuel Goldwyn Productions and distributed by MGM. It was directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who also wrote the screenplay. The film is based on the 1950 Broadway musical by composer and lyricist Frank Loesser, with a book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows based on “The Idyll Of Miss Sarah Brown” and “Blood Pressure”..

9.Robin and the Seven Hoods

Robin and the 7 Hoods is a 1964 American musical film directed by Gordon Douglas and starring Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Bing Crosby. The picture features Peter Falk, Barbara Rush, and Edward G. Robinson in an un-credited cameo. Written by David R. Schwartz, the film transplants the Robin Hood legend to a 1930s Chicago setting – though the film’s utterly opportunistic Marian is very different from the faithful Maid Marian of the original legend.

10. Young at Heart

Young at Heart is a 1954 musical film starring Doris Day and Frank Sinatra, directed by Gordon Douglas, and featuring a supporting cast including Gig Young, Ethel Barrymore, Alan Hale, Jr. and Dorothy Malone. The picture was the first of five films that Douglas directed with Sinatra and was a remake of the 1938 film Four Daughters.

11.None but the Brave

None but the Brave, also known as Yūsha nomi in Japan, is a 1965 war film starring Frank Sinatra, Clint Walker, Tatsuya Mihashi, Tommy Sands and Brad Dexter. This is the only film directed by Frank Sinatra, and the first Japanese-American co-production, produced by Sinatra for Warner Bros. and Kikumaru Okuda for Toho Studios..

12.The Detective

The Detective is a 1968 film directed by Gordon Douglas, produced by Aaron Rosenberg and starring Frank Sinatra, based on the 1966 novel of the same name by Roderick Thorp. Co-stars include Lee Remick, Jacqueline Bisset, Jack Klugman, William Windom and Robert Duvall, with a script by Academy Award-winning screenwriter Abby Mann.

13.Ocean’s 11

Ocean’s 11 is a 1960 heist film directed by Lewis Milestone and starring five Rat Packers: Peter Lawford, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Joey Bishop. Centered on a series of Las Vegas casino robberies, the film’s other stars included Angie Dickinson, Cesar Romero, Richard Conte, Akim Tamiroff, Henry Silva, Ilka Chase, Norman Fell, Harry Wilson and Buddy Lester, as well as cameo appearances by Shirley MacLaine, Red Skelton, and George Raft.

14.The Joker Is Wild

The Joker Is Wild is a 1957 American musical drama film directed by Charles Vidor, starring Frank Sinatra, Mitzi Gaynor, Jeanne Crain, and Eddie Albert, and released by Paramount Pictures. The film is about Joe E. Lewis, the popular singer and comedian who was a major attraction in nightclubs from the 1920s to the early 1950s.

15.Contract on Cherry Street

Contract on Cherry Street is a film version of a novel written by Phillip Rosenberg about a New York police detective, adapted for television in 1977 by Frank Sinatra’s production company Artanis and starring Sinatra. Directed by William A. Goldwyn and produced by Hugh Benson, Renee Valente and Sinatra, Contract on Cherry Street was trumpeted as a major event that garnered positive reviews and strong ratings when it premiered on NBC on November 19, 1977.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frank Sinatra is considered many things to many people, but to music lovers, he’s one of the best singers of all time. A member of the legendary “Rat Pack,” crooner Sinatra could do it all. Outside of his music career, “Ol’ Blue Eyes” was also a talented actor, director, and film producer.

LIST OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL MUSIC HITS OF FRANK SINATRA:

1.In The Wee Small Hours

2.Songs For Swingin’ Lovers! 

3.Sings For Only The Lonely /

Sings For Only The Lonely – 2018 Stereo Mix

4.Come Fly With Me 

5.Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim 

6.September Of My Years

7.Nice ‘n’ Easy

8.Come Dance With Me! 

9.Songs For Young Lovers

10.Sinatra-Basie: An Historic Musical First

 

Who is Frank Sinatra?

 

 

Francis Albert Sinatra was born on December 12, 1915, in an upstairs tenement at 415 Monroe Street in Hoboken, New Jersey, the only child of Italian immigrants Natalina “Dolly” Garaventa and Antonino Martino “Marty” Sinatra. Sinatra weighed 13.5 pounds (6.1 kg) at birth and had to be delivered with the aid of forceps, which caused severe scarring to his left cheek, neck, and ear, and perforated his eardrum—damage that remained for life.  Due to his injuries at birth, his baptism at St. Francis Church in Hoboken was delayed until April 2, 1916. A childhood operation on his mastoid bone left major scarring on his neck, and during adolescence he suffered from cystic acne that further scarred his face and neck. Sinatra was raised in the Roman Catholic church.

Sinatra’s mother was energetic and driven, and biographers believe that she was the dominant factor in the development of her son’s personality traits and self-confidence. Sinatra’s fourth wife Barbara would later claim that Dolly was abusive to him as a child, and “knocked him around a lot”. Dolly became influential in Hoboken and in local Democratic Party circles. She worked as a midwife, earning $50 for each delivery, and according to Sinatra biographer Kitty Kelley, also ran an illegal abortion service that catered to Italian Catholic girls, for which she was nicknamed “Hatpin Dolly”. She also had a gift for languages and served as a local interpreter.

Sinatra’s illiterate father was a bantamweight boxer who fought under the name Marty O’Brien. He later worked for 24 years at the Hoboken Fire Department, working his way up to captain. Sinatra spent much time at his parents’ tavern in Hoboken, working on his homework and occasionally singing a song on top of the player piano for spare change. During the Great Depression, Dolly provided money to her son for outings with friends and to buy expensive clothes, resulting in neighbors describing him as the “best-dressed kid in the neighborhood”. Excessively thin and small as a child and young man, Sinatra’s skinny frame later became a staple of jokes during stage shows.

Sinatra developed an interest in music, particularly big band jazz, at a young age. He listened to Gene Austin, Rudy Vallée, Russ Colombo, and Bob Eberly, and idolized Bing Crosby. Sinatra’s maternal uncle, Domenico, gave him a ukulele for his 15th birthday, and he began performing at family gatherings. Sinatra attended David E. Rue Jr. High School from 1928, and A. J. Demarest High School (since renamed as Hoboken High School) in 1931, where he arranged bands for school dances. He left without graduating, having attended only 47 days before being expelled for “general rowdiness” To please his mother, he enrolled at Drake Business School, but departed after 11 months. Dolly found Sinatra work as a delivery boy at the Jersey Observer newspaper, where his godfather Frank Garrick worked, and after that, Sinatra was a riveter at the Tietjen and Lang shipyard. He performed in local Hoboken social clubs such as The Cat’s Meow and The Comedy Club, and sang for free on radio stations such as WAAT in Jersey City. In New York, Sinatra found jobs singing for his supper or for cigarettes. To improve his speech, he began taking elocution lessons for a dollar each from vocal coach John Quinlan, who was one of the first people to notice his impressive vocal range.

FRANK SINATRA 1915-1998.

 

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